Staff

Mary Elizabeth Moore, Editor, is Dean of the School of Theology and Professor of Theology and Education at Boston University. Her passion is to journey with others to cultivate deeper faith, compassionate humanity, and a more just, peaceful, and sustainable world. She feels privileged to work toward those ends with colleagues in Boston University and around the world, especially in the practices of knowing the Holy, building justice, resisting violence, and caring for the earth. Her books include: Teaching as a Sacramental Act; Ministering with the Earth; Covenant and Call; Teaching from the Heart; and The United Methodist Diaconate (co-authored); plus three edited volumes, Children, Youth, and Spirituality in a Troubling World; Practical Theology and Hermeneutics; and A Living Tradition: Critical Recovery of the Wesleyan Heritage. She has engaged in interreligious relationship-building in local, professional, and academic settings and is presently working on a project to develop interreligious approaches to practical theology.

 

Or N. Rose, Editor, is the founding director of the Miller Center for Interreligious Learning & Leadership which promotes religious and cultural literacy, dialogue, and joint action for the common good. He also was founding director of the former Center for Global Judaism, which provides educational programming and resources on issues of contemporary Jewish spirituality, Israel-Diaspora relations, religious pluralism and environmental responsibility. In addition to his duties at the Miller Center, Rose serves as co-director of the Center for Interreligious and Community Leadership Education, a joint venture of Hebrew College and Andover Newton Theological School. Prior to taking this position, Rose was associate dean and director of informal education at the Rabbinical School, where he still teaches. He is co-editor of "Jewish Mysticism and the Spiritual Life: Classical Texts, Contemporary Reflections" (Jewish Lights, 2010) and "My Neighbor's Faith: Stories of Interreligious Encounter, Growth and Transformation (Orbis, 2012).

 

Axel Marc Oaks Takács, Editor-in-Chief, is a doctoral candidate at Harvard Divinity School. His areas of focus are Islamic Studies, Christian theology, and comparative theology. He is currently working on his dissertation, which is an exercise in comparative and constructive theology between a Christian and Islamic textual tradition. While having studied the classical and post-classical Islamic intellectual tradition broadly, his more narrow specialty is on the formative Islamic mystical tradition of Muḥyiddin ibn ʿArabī, his later Arabic and Persian interpreters, and its influence on the Persian poetic tradition.  On the Christian side, he reads pre-modern theological texts in search of constructive theological application in our contemporary world, always with a comparative lens that reflects the multi-religious and pluralistic world in which we live.  In addition to his editorial position at the Journal of Inter-Religious Studies, he is the co-founder and current Editor-in-Chief of the graduate student publication, Journal of Comparative Theology (www.comparativetheology.org). He has published in numerous journals, including the Journal of Ecumenical Studies, the Journal of the Muḥyiddin ibn ʿArabī Society, and The Cord. His most recent publication is a book chapter in How To Do Comparative Theology (Fordham University Press, forthcoming): “An Interpreter and Not a Judge: Insights into Christian-Islamic Comparative Theology.” He is currently a residential house tutor at Kirkland House of Harvard College.

 

img_0452Silvia P. Glick, Assistant Editor, is also the managing editor and assistant director of The Howard Thurman Papers Project at Boston University School of Theology, which she joined in 2012. Prior to working as an editor she practiced law for many years. She is a doctoral candidate at the Editorial Institute at Boston University’s Graduate School of Arts & Sciences. Her dissertation is an annotated edition of the correspondence of Fanny Goldstein—the founder of Jewish Book Week, a social activist, and a librarian and curator of Judaica at the Boston Public Library. Her work has been supported by a fellowship from the Jacob Rader Marcus Center of the American Jewish Archives. Silvia holds an M.T.S. from Harvard Divinity School and a J.D. from Boston University School of Law, where she served as an articles editor for the Boston University Public Interest Law Journal.

 

peace-newJennifer Peace, Coordinating Editor of the American Academy of Religion Issue, is a Visiting Associate Professor of Religious Pluralism at Harvard Divinity School. She co-directed the Center for Interreligious and Communal Leadership Education (CIRCLE) a joint program between Andover Newton Theological School and the Rabbinical School at Hebrew College. She received her doctorate in the Historical and Cultural Study of Religions from the Graduate Theological Union. She is the co-chair for the Interreligious & Interfaith Studies Group of the AAR, and a founding member of the Association for Interreligious Studies.

 

Soren M. Hessler, Administrative Director, is Associate Director of the Betty Ann Greenbaum Miller Center for Interreligious Learning & Leadership at Hebrew College and Chapel Associate for Leadership Development at Boston University's Marsh Chapel. He is an ordained elder in the West Ohio Annual Conference of the United Methodist Church and a member of the United Methodist Ecumenical and Interreligious Training Young Adult Network related to the ecumenical staff of the denomination’s council of bishops. Rev. Hessler holds master’s degrees in church administration, education, and theology from Boston University and is a practical theology PhD candidate at the university’s school of theology, where his research focuses on the history and practice of accreditation at theological schools in the United States in the early twentieth century.

 

The Journal of Interreligious Studies is published by the Betty Ann Greenbaum Miller Center for Interreligious Learning & Leadership at Hebrew College and Boston University School of Theology

 

State of Formation is a forum for nearly 250 emerging religious and ethical leaders from across the country and beyond. Founded by the The Journal of Interreligious Studies, it is now a program of Betty Ann Greenbaum Miller Center for Interreligious Learning & Leadership at Hebrew College and Boston University School of Theology.